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From our interactive museum exhibits to our Research Library to our premier meeting and event space, there's always something fun happening at the Oregon Historical Society. See below for upcoming events.

Unless otherwise noted, programs take place at the Oregon Historical Society building in downtown Portland (1200 SW Park Avenue) and are free of charge with museum admission. Click on links or call (503) 222-1741 for more information.

 

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Screening: The Boy Mayor

Thursday, April 24 at 7 PM

At the Hollywood Theatre 

Regular Hollywood Theatre Admission Required. Ticket prices range from $5-8 and will be available for purchase online and in person soon. Please visit http://hollywoodtheatre.org/visit-theatre/ for further details.

 

Among the thousands of motion pictures held by the Oregon Historical Society’s moving image archive is The Boy Mayor, a 1914 silent film made by Universal and starring Eugene J. Rich, the actual “Boy Mayor” of Portland.  Now, thanks to a generous grant from the National Film Preservation Foundation and the work of Preservationist Michele Kribs, OHS’s copy of the Boy Mayor has been completely restored and digitized, and will be shown on the big screen (along with other films from the OHS Moving Images Archive) at the Hollywood Theatre on April 24, with live piano accompaniment performed by our very own Library Director Geoff Wexler!

 

About The Boy Mayor

Directed by Henry McRae, The Boy Mayor dramatizes a unique interlude in Oregon’s history. The film originated during the Progressive Era, when cities throughout the U.S. experimented with methods to control what was then called “vice.”  In an effort to provide guidance to boys in danger of delinquency, Progressive Portlanders established the Newsboys’ Home and Clubhouse at SW First and Hall Streets. To raise funds for the home, the organization’s leaders began the “Boy Mayor” contest in May of 1912, coinciding with the Rose Festival and modeled on a similar campaign from the previous year. Candidates were chosen by the public schools, and the final election took place through ballot boxes placed throughout the city.

 

In July 1914 Eugene J. Rich was chosen as Portland’s Boy Mayor. He ran on a platform of public ownership of utilities and better playgrounds, and he took office with four junior commissioners, a junior district attorney, and a boy auditor. Later that year, the Universal Film Manufacturing Company brought Rich to Hollywood, along with Earl R. Goodwin, a Lincoln High School football star, who played Rich’s secretary in the film. The Boy Mayor premiered in Portland at the Star Theatre at SW Washington and Park in December of 1914.

 

Genealogy Workshop

“Search & Rescue: How to Improve your Searching & Analysis”

Saturday, April 26, 10 AM - Noon

$20, $15 for OHS Members

RSVP: libreference@ohs.org or 503.306.5240

 

You may know where to search for a genealogy record, but not how to search for it. This class will provide detailed tricks and methodology how-to’s in order to find the information and records you are looking for. We will cover how to effectively use online search engines and databases and how to analyze and draw clues out of the information you have.

 

History Pub

“History of PCUN, Oregon’s largest Latino organization”

Monday, April 28 at 7 PM

Presenters: Larry Kleinman and Ramon Ramirez

At McMenamins Kennedy School

Free and open to the public; canned food donations accepted for the Oregon Food Bank

 

Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Norestre (Northwest Treeplanters and Farmworkers United) was founded on April 29, 1985, by eighty farmworkers and is today located in the state’s agricultural hub of Woodburn. Since its founding, PCUN has registered more than 6,000 members, founded a radio station, run campaigns to support a wide variety of workers’ rights, joined leadership of national immigration reform efforts, and founded CAPECES, a leadership institute. This History Pub program will commemorate the organization’s twenty-ninth anniversary with first-person accounts from co-founders Larry Kleniman, who will discuss the organization’s history, and Ramon Ramirez, who will speak about the state of the current farmworker movement in Oregon. Current PCUN leader Jaime Arrendondo and farmworker Carmen Gonzales will attend to answer questions on the impact of PCUN. Many of PCUN’s archival materials are now held by the University of Oregon Special Collections, and Head of Special Collections & University Archives James Fox will be in attendance to answer questions and display some of the collection.

 

Join us for beer and history at our monthly History Pub — organized by McMenamins, Holy Names Heritage Center, and OHS and supported by a grant from the Multnomah County Cultural Coalition, funded by the Oregon Cultural Trust — where you can listen to lively local history while sipping on a pint of handcrafted ale.

 

Mark O. Hatfield Distinguished Historians Forum

Senator Olympia Snowe, author of Fighting for Common Ground: How We Can Fix the Stalemate in Congress

Tuesday, April 29 at 7 PM

At the First Congregational Church

Tickets start at $22.50 | Buy Tickets Now

 

Olympia Snowe’s dedicated work in the U.S. Senate has garnered her nationwide recognition as a leading policymaker in Washington. With her election in 1994, Snowe became only the second woman Senator in history to represent Maine, following the late Sen. Margaret Chase Smith, who served from 1949–1973. Snowe is the author of the recently published Fighting for Common Ground, in which she shares her life story and her frank recommendations on how to make the world’s greatest deliberative body once again fulfill its mission.

 

Screening (Salem): The Boy Mayor

Wednesday, April 30 at 7 PM

The Elsinore Theatre (170 High St SE, Salem, 97301)

Regular Elsinore Theatre Admission Required

Tickets available soon. Please visit http://www.elsinoretheatre.com/events/ for further details.

 

Among the thousands of motion pictures held by the Oregon Historical Society’s moving image archive is The Boy Mayor, a 1914 silent film made by Universal and starring Eugene J. Rich, the actual “Boy Mayor” of Portland. Now, thanks to a generous grant from the National Film Preservation Foundation and the work of Preservationist Michele Kribs, OHS’s copy of the Boy Mayor has been completely restored and digitized. Directed by Henry McRae, The Boy Mayor dramatizes a unique interlude in Oregon’s history. The film originated during the Progressive Era, when cities throughout the U.S. experimented with methods to control what was then called “vice.” In an effort to provide guidance to boys in danger of delinquency, Progressive Portlanders established the Newsboys’ Home and Clubhouse at SW First and Hall Streets. To raise funds for the home, the organization’s leaders began the “Boy Mayor” contest in May of 1912, coinciding with the Rose Festival and modeled on a similar campaign from the previous year. Candidates were chosen by the public schools, and the final election took place through ballot boxes placed throughout the city.

 

In July 1914 Eugene J. Rich was chosen as Portland’s Boy Mayor. He ran on a platform of public ownership of utilities and better playgrounds, and he took office with four junior commissioners, a junior district attorney, and a boy auditor. Later that year, the Universal Film Manufacturing Company brought Rich to Hollywood, along with Earl R. Goodwin, a Lincoln High School football star, who played Rich’s secretary in the film. The Boy Mayor premiered in Portland at the Star Theatre at SW Washington and Park in December of 1914.

 

Conversation Project

“Church and State: Religion and Politics in America”

Thursday, May 1, 6 PM

Courtney Campbell

Sponsored by Oregon Humanities, presented by Portland Rotary and OHS

Free and open to the public

 

Despite a Constitution that vests political authority in “we the people” and makes no mention of “God,” America’s highest elected representatives have historically assumed their offices by taking an oath while placing a hand on the Bible or, in some cases, on the Bhagavad-Gita or the Qur’an. There are numerous examples of American identity being conveyed through religious symbols or words, such as the Pledge of Allegiance, the national motto on currency and coinage (“In God We Trust”), and the customary conclusion to a presidential address, “God Bless America.” How did these religious traditions begin, and what issues prompted their adoption? What does their ongoing practice say about religious identity in American public life? This is the focus of “Church and State: Religion and Politics in America.” Through the Conversation Project, Oregon Humanities offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future.

 

Annual Meeting of the Membership

Saturday, May 3 at Noon

 

Please join us for the Oregon Historical Society’s 2014 Annual Meeting of the Membership. The program will begin at noon, and admission is free to all. The Annual Meeting is an opportunity for you to learn about accomplishments at OHS during 2013 and our plans for 2014 and beyond. Following the meeting, OHS Library Director Geoff Wexler will give a special presentation titled, “The Oregon Historical Society: From Past to Future.” From George Himes and the pioneers to Kerry Tymchuk and Oregon Voices, Geoff shares the history of the Society through stories and photographs from our collection.

 

Oregon Encyclopedia History Night: Portland

Part of the Oregon Encyclopedia Literary History Series

Phillip Margolin

Monday, May 5 at 7 PM

At McMenamins Mission Theater

 

Oregon author Philip Margolin will discuss his book Worthy Brown's Daughter, a historical novel set in Oregon in 1860 inspired by the only Oregon case dealing with slavery. Each month, the Oregon Encyclopedia hosts History Nights at McMenamins Pubs in Portland and Bend. History Nights are sponsored by the Oregon Historical Society, the Oregon Encyclopedia, and the Des Chutes Historical Museum. This series is presented in partnership with the Oregon Council of Teachers of English. Learn more about the Oregon Encyclopedia at http://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/.

 

Second Sunday Series

"Like Mom Used to Make: How Mothers Changed Breakfast Forever"

Heather Arndt Anderson

Sunday, May 11, 2 PM

Free and open to the public

 

On this special Mother's Day edition of Second Sunday at the Oregon Historical Society, Heather Arndt Anderson, author of Breakfast: A History, will discuss how mothers have informed the way we eat the most important meal of the day. How did the Mother's Day brunch come into existence; who invented eggs Benedict and the mimosa? And perhaps more importantly, who does the cooking when mothers step out of the kitchen? Through Arndt Anderson's humorous, in-depth exploration of the morning meal, discover the ways early-twentieth-century convenience foods, war-era children, and doting husbands became Mother's little helpers.

 

Oregon Encyclopedia Spring Community Meetings

May 12 – 15

Meeting Times & Locations Listed Below

 

This Spring, The Oregon Encyclopedia will again travel the state in partnership with local libraries and museums to hold public community meetings. At each stop, OE editors will present on the encyclopedia project and discuss in an open forum the significant people, places, and events in the region that should be added to The OE. Library and museum staff will share information about the resources available at their institutions to help people research the history of  their local communities. The events are free and open to all. Bring your local history expertise and contribute to the ongoing publication of authoritative Oregon history and culture on the Web. The meetings are supported in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the Oregon State Library.

 

Meeting Schedule

 

Monday, May 12, 5:30 - 7:30 PM

Jeanne E. Burch Building, Fossil

In partnership with Fossil Museum

 

Tuesday, May 13, 6 – 8 PM

Sherman County Public Library, Moro

In partnership with the Sherman County Historical Museum

 

Wednesday, May 14, 6:30 – 8 AM

Gilliam County Historical Museum, Condon

In partnership with Gilliam County Historical Museum

 

Thursday, May 15, 5:30 - 7:30 PM

Morrow County Museum, Heppner

In partnership with Morrow County Museum

 

Mark O. Hatfield Distinguished Historians Forum

Fredrik Logevall, author of Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam

Tuesday, May 13 at 7 PM

At the First Congregational Church

Tickets start at $22.50 | Buy Tickets Now

 

Fredrik Logevall is the John S. Knight Professor of International Studies, Director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies, and was recently appointed Cornell’s Vice Provost for International Relations. He earned a doctorate from Yale University and previously taught at University of California, Santa Barbara, where he co-founded the Center for Cold War Studies. His latest book, Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam, won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History as well as numerous other awards.

 

Wayne Morse Legacy Series Event

"The Meaning of the Vietnam War"

Fredrik Logevall

Wednesday, May 14, 7 PM

175 Knight Law Center, Eugene

Free and open to the public

 

Fredrik Logevall is the John S. Knight Professor of International Studies, Director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies, and was recently appointed Cornell’s Vice Provost for International Relations. He earned a doctorate from Yale University and previously taught at University of California, Santa Barbara, where he co-founded the Center for Cold War Studies. His latest book, Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam, won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History as well as numerous other awards.

 

This event is part of the Wayne Morse Legacy Series presented by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. All events are free and opened to the public and are cosponsored by The UO Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, Oregon Historical Society and the World Affairs Council of Oregon. This event is also cosponsored by UO Savage Endowment, History Department, and Oregon Humanities Center. Learn more at http://waynemorsecenter.uoregon.edu/the-wayne-morse-legacy/wayne-morse-legacy-series/

 

 

When Oregon Mattered

Presented by OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk

Thursday, May 15, 7 PM

Free and open to the public

 

Every four years Americans participate in the great process of electing a president. And every four years, voters in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, and a handful of other states have decided the Republican and Democrat nominees long before Oregon’s May primary election. There was a time, however, when Oregon’s presidential primary was an important stop on the road to the White House. OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk shares the stories of the three most historic and colorful presidential campaign battles in Oregon.   

 

Genealogy Workshop

“Family Tree Software & Research Logs”

Thursday, May 15, 1 PM – 3 PM

Cost: $20, $15 for members

 

Organization is key to being a successful genealogist. In this class we will focus on organizing your information. Come learn about all of the various family tree software programs and how to use them, along with learning how to keep track of your research and notes. By the end of the class you will be on the road to a calmer mind and a tidier office.

 

When Oregon Mattered

Presented by OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk

Thursday, May 15, 7 PM

Free and open to the public

 

Every four years Americans participate in the great process of electing a president. And every four years, voters in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, and a handful of other states have decided the Republican and Democrat nominees long before Oregon’s May primary election. There was a time, however, when Oregon’s presidential primary was an important stop on the road to the White House. OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk shares the stories of the three most historic and colorful presidential campaign battles in Oregon.

 

OHS Library Surplus Book Sale

Saturday, May 17, 10 AM – 4 PM

Early Access for Members Only 8 AM – 10 AM

Regular OHS Admission Prices Apply

 

The Davies Family Research Library invites you to its spring surplus book sale on Saturday, May 17. The sale will feature books, maps, newspapers, photographs, and more, all that are either duplicates of existing OHS holdings or are out of scope for our library collections. No permanent OHS holdings are being sold. Prices for most books will range from $1-$5, but a number of out-of-print or rare items will be offered a higher ranges. Most works relate to the history of Oregon and the American West, but a wide range of other subjects are also included. The OHS Museum Store will also have a wide selection of surplus books on sale for only $1!

 

This year we will have an early opening for OHS members only, from 8 AM – 10 AM. Not a member? Get early access to the biggest sale of the year by joining today!

 

Mark O. Hatfield Distinguished Historians Forum

“An Evening with Teddy Roosevelt”

Tuesday, May 20 at 7 PM

At the First Congregational Church

Tickets start at $22.50 | Buy Tickets Now

 

Watch as the Rough Rider comes to life at an exciting living history event with Joe Wiegand, the nation’s leading Teddy Roosevelt recreator. This special bonus lecture is part of the 2014 Teddy Roosevelt Roadshow sponsored by Wells Fargo.

 

History Pub

“‘Bud Was Serious!’: A 30th-Anniversary Retrospective of Bud Clark’s Successful Race for Mayor of Portland”

Monday, May 19 at 7 PM

At McMenamins Kennedy School

Free and open to the public; canned food donations accepted for the Oregon Food Bank

 

Join us for beer and history at our monthly History Pub, — organized by McMenamins, Holy Names Heritage Center, and OHS and supported by a grant from the Multnomah County Cultural Coalition, funded by the Oregon Cultural Trust — where you can listen to lively local history while sipping on a pint of handcrafted ale. Bud Clark's Portland mayoral campaign of 1984 was as remarkable and unexpected as it was successful. Its first achievement was convincing voters that the well-liked tavern-keeper who had never previously held a public office was a serious candidate! To commemorate the thirtieth anniversary of the landmark Clark campaign, former staffers (including Mike Ryerson) and Bud Clark himself will convene for a panel discussion. Longtime Portland political analyst Tim Hibbitts will give an introductory presentation about the city's political climate of the 1970s and early '80s, then serve as moderator for the panel discussion.

 

Book Cover Design Contest for Students

Presented by the Oregon Historical Society, The Oregon Encyclopedia, and Ooligan Press

Submission Deadline: May 31 at Midnight

 

Think you have what it takes to design an award-winning book of Oregon historical fiction?  Enter the OHS Book Cover Design Contest! Meet published authors, talk to professional book designers, and learn about college design programs at the award ceremony on June 21 at the Oregon Historical Society. Your winning book cover will be displayed on The Oregon Encyclopedia. Cash prizes!

 

Contest Rules

  1. The contest is open to all Oregon and SW Washington middle and high school students.
  2. Students must send a high-resolution PDF of their book cover to bookcover@ohs.org   
  3. A book title and plot description of no more than 75 words must accompany the design and should describe the imagined story and its link to Oregon history.
  4. Student name, contact information, school, and grade level should be included in the email submission.
  5. Professional designers and book publishers will evaluate submissions on creativity, artistry, and the use of Oregon history in the overall design.

 

Visit the contest page at The Oregon Encyclopedia for full rules and submission details.

 

Oregon Encyclopedia History Night: Portland

Part of the Oregon Encyclopedia Literary History Series

Paulann Petersen and Paul Merchant

Monday, June 2 at 7 PM

At McMenamins Mission Theater

 

Oregon Poet Laureate Paulann Petersen and award-winning poet Paul Merchant, Director of the William Stafford Archives, will present on William Stafford's life, work, and influence in this, the centenary year of his birth. Each month, the Oregon Encyclopedia hosts History Nights at McMenamins Pubs in Portland and Bend. History Nights are sponsored by the Oregon Historical Society, the Oregon Encyclopedia, and the Des Chutes Historical Museum. This series is presented in partnership with the Oregon Council of Teachers of English. Learn more about the Oregon Encyclopedia at http://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/.

 

Wayne Morse Legacy Series Event

“Congress, War Powers and the War on Terror”

Steven Vladek, American University; Garrett Epps, University of Baltimore; and Louis Fisher, The Constitution Project

Wednesday, June 11, 5 PM

US Capitol Building, Washington D.C.

Free and open to the public

Reception at 6:30 p.m. cohosted by members of the Oregon Congressional Delegation and the UO Alumni Association

 

Louis Fisher is a Scholar in Residence at The Constitution Project and formerly was a specialist in Separation of Powers at the Library of Congress. Steven Vladek is a Professor of Law and the Associate Dean for Scholarship at American University Washington College of Law. Garrett Epps teaches constitutional law and creative writing at University of Baltimore. His most recent book is Wrong and Dangerous: Ten Right-Wing Myths about Our Constitution. Cosponsored by The Constitution Project.

 

This event is part of the Wayne Morse Legacy Series presented by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. Wayne Morse was known for many policies that he championed – labor rights, civil rights, aid to education and conservation. But his most enduring legacy is his consistent and courageous dissent against the Vietnam War. These programs highlight Morse’s prescient opposition to the war on constitutional and moral grounds and the continuing issues of war powers and military policy. All events are free and opened to the public and are cosponsored by The UO Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, Oregon Historical Society, and World Affairs Council of Oregon.

 

Summer Community Day

Saturday, June 21, 11 AM – 3 PM

Free and open to the public

 

This free, summer community day is all about how we use imagination to explore the past. Portland authors Lois Leveen and Ruth Tenzer Feldman’s historical fiction novels build engaging, enlightening stories from real historical people and events. Leveen’s The Secrets of Mary Bowser is an illuminating tale of the real woman who posed as a slave in Jefferson Davis’s home to spy for the Union during the Civil War. It is directed at adult readers but has been read and enjoyed by high school and engaged middle school readers as well. Feldman’s Blue Thread brings an imaginary person, sixteen-year-old Miriam Josefsohn, into the real world of Portland’s 1912 debate over woman suffrage as well as an ancient, biblical debate over women’s rights. While Feldman’s book is written with young adult readers in mind, like many young adult novels, it is just as engaging for adult readers. OHQ Editor Eliza Canty-Jones will facilitate the conversation, drawing out themes ranging from issues of slavery and women’s rights to how historical fiction is written and how history is told and remembered today. Winners of the Oregon Historical Society Book Cover Design Contest will also be announced. Visit the Oregon Encyclopedia for full contest details.

 

Make Your Next Meeting Historic!

 

Are you a member of a group or organization that would like to learn more about the Oregon Historical Society? Invite an OHS volunteer docent to attend your next meeting to learn about the exciting programs and services YOUR Historical Society has to offer!

 

Please fill out the form below and return to Rachel Randles at communications@ohs.org or by mail to 1200 SW Park Avenue, Portland, OR 97205. Once we receive your request, we will connect you with a volunteer docent to further discuss your event.

 

Event Request Form (PDF)

 

Partner Events & Programs

 

Reciprocal Membership with the Washington State Historical Society

April through July 2014

CIVIL-WAR 

OHS members can enjoy an extra dose of Civil War history this summer with free membership to the Washington State Historical Society in Tacoma from April through July. After seeing 2 Years, 1 Month: Lincoln’s Legacy at OHS, travel up north for a visit to Civil War Pathways in the Pacific Northwest, on exhibit now through July 6, 2014.

 

Join WSHS on a groundbreaking exploration of the American Civil War, and the role and impact it had on the Northwest. Though it’s commonly perceived as a war that happened almost exclusively back East, the Civil War took place on a national battle field, as Americans clashed over radically different ideas: slavery, state’s rights, political dissent, and federal power. With more than 150 original artifacts and stories from primary documents, this exhibition looks at the profound impact this war had on the lives of Washingtonians, and the choices that citizens, soldiers, and slaves made during this pivotal era. Learn more at www.civilwarpathways.org.

 

Lecture: “Out of the Nuclear Shadow: Scientists and the Struggle Against the Bomb,” Dr. Zia Mian 

2014 Linus Pauling Legacy Award

Monday, April 21, 7:30 PM

Oregon Historical Society

Free and Open to the Public

Sponsored by Oregon State University Libraries & Press

 

Princeton University professor Dr. Zia Mian will present his lecture, titled "Out of the Nuclear Shadow: Scientists and the Struggle Against the Bomb." Mian will be honored as the eighth recipient of the Linus Pauling Legacy Award, granted once every two years for outstanding achievement in an area of study once of interest to Dr. Linus Pauling. The Pauling Legacy Award is sponsored by Oregon State University Libraries & Press. Learn more here: http://paulingblog.wordpress.com/2014/02/28/zia-mian-is-the-2014-pauling-legacy-award-winner/

 

Oregon Experience

From historical biographies to issues and events that have shaped our state, Oregon Experience is an exciting television series co-produced by OPB and the Oregon Historical Society. The series explores Oregon’s rich past and helps all of us – from natives to newcomers – gain a better understanding of the historical, social, and political fabric of our state. Each half-hour show brings to life fascinating characters – both familiar and forgotten – who have played key roles in building our state into the unique place we call home.

 

Upcoming Episodes:

 

“Sam Hill”

Air Date: Friday, April 18, 4:00 AM

 

“William Gladstone Steel”

Air Date: Friday, April 18, 4:30 AM

 

“C.E.S. Wood”

Air Date: Monday, April 21, 9:00 PM

 

“Reub Long's Oregon Desert”

Air Date: Monday, April 21, 9:30 PM

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