Call for Proposals: Oregon Historical Quarterly issue on White Supremacy and Resistance

Background

The Oregon Historical Quarterly has committed to producing a special issue that will explore the state’s history of white supremacy, including resistance to white supremacist policies and practices. The issue will examine the complexity of this subject by approaching it from a variety of historical perspectives, from around the time of statehood through today. Subjects include the state’s political founders, the experiences of Indigenous peoples, labor history, organized white supremacist groups, individual and organized resistance to white supremacist policies, structures of white supremacy, and ongoing legacies. This framework has been crafted by a design team composed of scholars and writers who have both intellectual and personal experience with this history1.  The team will select a smaller group of guest editors, who will work with OHQ staff to select authors, review manuscripts, and write some essays for the issue. Proposals are invited for specific articles, as outlined in the table of contents below. Note that editors will consider proposals for a co-authored articles or for a single portion of an article; we recognize that many scholars may be able to address only portions of an outlined article and will work to create co-authored pieces, or to group pieces into a whole.

Timeline

The issue is tentatively scheduled for publication in Winter (December) 2019. Proposals are due June 18, 2018. Invited authors will be notified by July 18, 2018, and manuscripts are due January 7, 2019. All manuscripts will undergo our regular peer-review process, which often requires at least one revision and, potentially, a second round of review. Quarterly editorial staff will work closely with authors throughout this process. We encourage proposals from people who can address an article individually or in collaboration with one or more co-authors; potential co-authors may be identified but are not required. The Quarterly will offer all authors an honorarium, in appreciation for their work.

Proposal Details

Proposals should be for a specific article from the table of contents, outlined below. (Note that the full table of contents is provided but that proposals will not be considered for three of the pieces.) Provide, formatted as a PDF, a statement of not more than 1,000 words outlining your research and analytical approach to the topic, including discussion of publications or presentations related to the subject, as well as a CV, resume, or a biographical statement that describes relevant experience. Please submit your article-specific proposal to the journal’s editor, Eliza Canty-Jones (eliza.canty-jones@ohs.org), as a single email attachment with the subject line “special issue proposal.” Proposals are due by June 18, 2018. Editors will consider proposals for a co-authored articles or for a single portion of an article; we recognize that many scholars may be able to address only portions of an outlined article and will work to create co-authored pieces, or to group pieces into a whole.

About OHQ

The Oregon Historical Quarterly has been published continuously since 1900 and is a peer-reviewed, scholarly journal with a broad audience of academics and general readers. Subscription is a benefit of membership with the Oregon Historical Society, and we currently mail to over 4,000 readers across Oregon and beyond. OHQ is available via JSTOR and Ebsco and is an important source for researchers around the world.

Download the RFP as a PDF

 

1 The Design Team includes Natalia Fernandez, Curator and Archivist of the Oregon Multicultural Archives and OSU Queer Archives; James Stanley Harrison, Portland Community College; Dr. David Lewis,  NDN History Research; Dr. Darrell Millner, Portland State University; Scot Nakagawa, ChangeLab; Dr. Carmen Thompson, Portland State University and Portland Community College; and Eric Ward, Western States Center. 

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction: This essay will include a definition of terms and broad context of whiteness and white supremacy, an overview of the issue's contents, and recognition that the current exploration of this topic is not comprehensive. The purpose of this essay is to orient readers to the concepts and terms that frame this historiography and to what they will find, or not, in the issue. This essay will be written by the issue's guest editor(s) or by one or more members of the Design Team. It is included here for contextual information; proposals to write this piece will not be considered.
  2. Pioneer-era white supremacy: This research article is to be grounded in primary documents related to Oregon’s founders and will give readers a baseline of understanding the people who created Oregon’s governmental structure, including their beliefs and debates specifically related to race. Although based in primary-source research, the article should also introduce readers to the broader political, social, economic, and cultural contexts of the era as well as to any valuable comparisons between Oregon’s white supremacy and that of other states, or the nation and/or world as a whole, at the time.
  3. Native Experience since contact/statehood: This article will give attention to the specific experience and history of the Indigenous people of today’s Oregon, including the ways that white supremacist ideas and policies (such as Manifest Destiny and the Doctrine of Discovery) impacted their communities, lands, and cultures. This article is expected to provide readers with a through-line of understanding, connecting the explicit white-supremacist beliefs and policies of the mid nineteenth century with their descendants in the decades that followed. Attention must be given to the geographic and cultural diversity of Oregon’s Indigenous peoples as well as to the variety of ways individuals and communities (and, potentially, their allies) resisted white supremacy.
  4. Structures of White Supremacy: This article will lay out for readers the ways that government and other structures, rather than individual interactions, have enabled white supremacy to persist over generations — often despite the efforts of well-intentioned people engaged in those systems. Ideally, this article will include comparisons between Oregon’s historical systems and those of other states and/or territories, helping readers see both the ways that structural racism persists and the ways it can be dismantled.
  5. Labor history, including unions: This article will investigate the historical intersections of labor (including organized unions) and white supremacy. It will address questions such as how have people used labor recruitment, organizing, and exploitation to both reinforce and resist white supremacy. The article must include a range of ethnic and racial experiences and cover a broad chronology.
  6. Organized White Supremacist/Nationalist groups: This article will analyze a variety of organized white supremacist groups in Oregon, across both time and geography, and offer readers conclusions about the patterns and changes over time that are related to those groups. The article must include a range of ethnic and racial experiences as related to this history as well as provide readers with contextual frameworks that help understand Oregon’s history as related to that of other places.
  7. Organized resistance work & resistance leaders: This article, or series of articles, will profile and analyze the individual and collective work of resistance to white supremacy in times and places throughout Oregon’s history. The article must include a range of ethnic and racial experiences as related to this history as well as provide readers with contextual frameworks that help understand Oregon’s white-supremacy resistance history as related to that of other places.
  8. Conclusion: The concluding essay will provide readers with an understanding of the contemporary legacies of white supremacy. It must include a range of ethnic and racial experiences, and it must help readers to see the through-lines — from pioneer days to today — that have created and maintained persistent gaps in wealth, education, health, and other areas between whites and everyone else. The essay may also address the legacies of resistance to white supremacy throughout Oregon’s history.
  9. Annotated bibliography & timeline: To be created by the guest editor and/or one or more members of the design team, these supplemental materials will be crafted with particular attention to making the issue of value researchers and classroom teachers.  This is included here for contextual information; proposals to write this piece will not be considered.
  10. Epilogue note: To be created by the guest editor and/or one or more members of the Design Team, this essay will outline the inspiration for and creation of the issue and offer suggestions for the journal’s next steps on the topic. This is included here for contextual information; proposals to write this piece will not be considered.