Lecture     Series: Second Sunday

The Last Great American Eclipse

Free and open to the public
Sunday, July 9, 2017
2PM – 3:30PM

  • Free
  • Family-friendly
  • Researchers
  • Teachers

Oregon Historical Society
1200 SW Park Ave
Portland, Oregon 97205
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Event Type: LectureAudience(s): Family-friendly, Researchers, TeachersLocation: Portland

In 1918, a total solar eclipse cut across the continental United States, from the Pacific to the Atlantic, passing directly over Oregon. Einstein had just put forth a new theory of gravity—General Relativity—at the end of 1915: a theory that had not yet been validated at the time of the eclipse. Could scientists from the United States be the first to put it to the test? This talk explores the intersection of history, science, and Oregon's role in the studies of eclipses and what they mean for our Universe.

Ethan Siegel was born in New York, got his Ph.D. in theoretical astrophysics from the University of Florida in 2006, and moved to Oregon in 2008 where he became a professor, grew a tremendous beard, and became Portland’s favorite astrophysicist (regularly featured on KGW). He has since become a renowned writer for NASA and Forbes, as well as a published author. His first book, Beyond the Galaxy, is available from World Scientific, and his second book, Treknology, about the real-life science behind the technologies envisioned in Star Trek, comes out this October.

Ethan will have copies of Beyond the Galaxy available for sale ($40 cash). Pre-order from Amazon.

Ability Accommodation Information

This event provides the following accommodations:

  • Handicap Accessible

A photograph of the Sun's corona and background stars during a total solar eclipse using modern equipment, far enhancing what the naked eye can perceive. Photograph by Miloslav Druckmuller.

A photograph of the Sun's corona and background stars during a total solar eclipse using modern equipment, far enhancing what the naked eye can perceive. Photograph by Miloslav Druckmuller.

Ethan Siegel in front of the American Astronomical Society's hyperwall during the January 2017 AAS meeting; photo by Harley Thronson.

Ethan Siegel in front of the American Astronomical Society's hyperwall during the January 2017 AAS meeting; photo by Harley Thronson.

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