Audio Recording     Series: History Pub

Stories of Resistance to Japanese American Incarceration and Discrimination

In recognition of the seventy-fifth anniversary of Franklin Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066, which sent 120,000 Japanese Americans to incarceration camps until after the conclusion of World War II, and the second annual Minoru Yasui Day, History Pub presented stories of those who stood against the incarceration and the racism faced by many Japanese Americans after the war. George Nakata grew up in Portland’s Nihonmachi and was incarcerated at Minidoka as a child. In his adulthood, Mr. Nakata has become a trusted story-teller, sharing many stories of incarceration from the community. Linda Tamura will highlight some of the Hood River, Oregon, residents who supported their Japanese American neighbors in the face of aggressive discrimination they faced after the war. They joined OPB Radio’s Think Out Loud to share the stories of Oregonians who fought against social and legal discrimination during the war years.

Interview with George Nakata and Linda Tamura

Think Out Loud on OPB, March 27, 2017

George Nakata was a U.S. citizen who was sent to an internment camp as a young boy during World War II. He joins us, along with Linda Tamura, professor emeritus of education at Willamette University, to share the stories of Oregonians who fought against social and legal discrimination during the war years. They both spoke at a Kennedy School History Pub event on Monday, March 27, 2017.

George Nakata at Minidoka Pilgrimage

About History Pub

Join us for beer and history, sponsored by the Oregon Historical Society, Holy Names Heritage Center, and McMenamins, in which you'll hear lively local or regional history while you enjoy a frosty pint or two of handcrafted ale.

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